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Birds + Pet Services

  • Kidney disease is relatively common in birds, especially budgies, and may present as an acute or chronic problem. Some of the clinical signs are very characteristic of kidney disease but many others are non-specific. This handout explains these signs, as well as how kidney disorders in birds can be diagnosed and treated.

  • Knemidocoptes is a type of bird mite that typically effects canaries, cockatiels and parakeets. It is commonly referred to as scaly face and leg disease. Specific antiparasitic drugs will be prescribed by a veterinarian to treat this disease.

  • Lead is a common household hazard for birds. Due to their curious, explorative nature, house birds can be exposed to lead around the house. Lead causes heavy metal toxicity, affecting the blood, nervous system, and gastrointestinal system. Lead poisoning can be fatal if not treated.

  • Leg bands are used as a form of identification for some pet birds. They are typically placed on the bird's foot when it is a baby. Leg bands may get caught in the cage , on toys or on fabric causing serious damage to the foot or leg.

  • Liver disease can occur in any avian species but is most common in cockatiels, budgies, Amazon parrots, lories, and mynah birds. Because the typical clinical signs are non-specific and descriptive of many different diseases, diagnostic tests are highly recommended. Treatment options depend on the diagnosis and can range from diet modification to hospitalization.

  • Lories and Lorikeets are small to medium size, energetic parrots. They come from southeastern Asia, Papua New Guinea, Australia, and Polynesia. They are fun-loving, social birds with a variety of brightly colored variations. Lories and Lorikeets can be high-maintenance pets and require a specific type of diet.

  • Grief is the normal and natural response to the loss of someone or something. When grieving, one is said to be in a state of bereavement. The loss of a pet can cause intense grief and sorrow. Given that so many people consider their pets as members of the family, this grief is normal and understandable. Each person experiences grief in a different way. Contrary to popular belief, grief does not unfold in clean, linear stages, nor does it have a timeline. Grief is a full body experience that includes physical, emotional, cognitive, social, and spiritual responses. A healthy grief journey comes from taking the time to work through feelings rather than trying to push them away, moving toward the experience of loss to learn to live with it. There are many ways to manage grief, including receiving support from others, finding comfort in routines and play, keeping active, taking breaks from the sadness, remembering your pet, memorializing your pet, searching for meaning, and eventually, possibly bringing a new pet into your life. Grieving takes time. Usually it gradually lessens in intensity over time, but if it doesn’t, then professional counseling may help.

  • The peach-faced lovebird is the largest and most commonly kept of the nine species of lovebirds. Lovebirds are incredibly inquisitive, playful, and possess a delightful, spirited sassiness. Although not generally very destructive, they do enjoy chewing. Young, single love birds bond closely with their owners and can be a wonderful, affectionate, and interactive family pet. A pair of lovebirds often bonds more strongly to each other even if they are the same sex. Young birds may be easier to tame and train than older, wild-caught, or colony- or parent-raised birds. After bringing your new bird home, you should have it examined by a veterinarian familiar with birds to help ensure that it is healthy. Like all other pet birds, lovebirds require annual, routine veterinary health check-ups.

  • Macaws are the largest members of the parrot family. They are high maintenance birds that require a great deal of space to house. They also require a lot of daily affection and attention. Their vocalizations tend to be loud, harsh, penetrating squawks. Their impressively large beak can be exceedingly destructive. Some commonly kept macaws include the blue and gold macaw, scarlet macaw, severe macaw, green-winged macaw, and the hyacinth macaw. Despite the exotic appeal of macaws, they are unsuitable for many households and family situations due to their loud screeching, destructive behavior, and great need for daily attention and time out of their cages. Macaws may be purchased from pet stores or reputable breeders or adopted from rescue organizations. After bringing your new bird home, you should have it examined by a veterinarian familiar with birds to help ensure that it is healthy. Like all other pet birds, macaws require annual, routine veterinary health check-ups.

  • Masturbation behavior in male parrots is a fairly common occurrence. The basis behind this activity is sexual stimulation or over productive male hormones. Veterinary attention will help with environmental changes and/or medications used to diminish or halt this behavior.